May 13th: NAMA “STAY” ASLEEP for Teens Ages 12-18

sleep-graphicNAMA “STAY” ASLEEP:
Yoga for Sleep and Relaxation For Teens Ages 12-18
Saturday, May 13th @ 11am – 12:30pm
w/ Jen Mast & Christine Fox
Pre-registration $25 / $35 day of workshop
{ REGISTER }

• The average amount of sleep that teenagers get is between 7 and 7 ¼ hours. However, they need between 9 and 9 ½ hours (studies show that most teenagers need exactly 9 ¼ hours of sleep).

• Teenagers do not get enough sleep for a number of reasons. One is a shift in sleep schedule. According to research at Stanford University on Adolescents and Sleep, “After centuries of assuming the longer we are awake, the sleepier we will become and the more we will tend to fall asleep, we were confronted by the surprising result that after 12 hours of being awake, the subjects were less sleepy than they had been earlier in the same day, and at the 10 o’clock test, after more than 14 hours of wakefulness had elapsed …they were even less sleepy.”

• Other reasons teens do not get enough sleep are school start times, and social and school obligations.

• This sleep deprivation affects mood, behavior, academic performance, drowsy driving, and cognitive ability.

• Stanford research reports, “What these studies show is that learning a new task, whether it is sports or music, will be greatly helped by getting a good night’s sleep and that students’ ability to remember things…” and “though sleeping in is a good thing, trying to get up after only an extra hour or two is a lot better than “binge-sleeping” on the weekends. If a student is used to getting up at 6:30 a.m., they shouldn’t sleep until noon on the weekend. That simply confuses their bodies.”If you are a teen interested in learning relaxation techniques and a bedtime routine to help with better quality sleep, join us for this special workshop.

References:

1. Sleep in Adolescents :: Nationwide Children’s Hospital
www.nationwidechildrens.org/sleep-in-adolescents

2. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/teenbrain/from/sleep.html

We will cover:

• Asana sequences (yoga postures) for better sleep

• Breathing techniques that help to quiet a busy mind and calm the nervous system

• Bring awareness to current night time behaviors that might be blocking our ability to sleep. Learn to listen to the messages our bodies are trying to give us at night.

• “Research shows that lack of sleep affects mood, and a depressed mood can lead to lack of sleep. To combat this vicious cycle, sleep experts recommend that teens prioritize sleep and focus on healthy sleep habits…keeping consistent sleep and wake schedules on school nights and weekends, and opting for relaxing activities…before bed…If parents and teens know what good sleep entails and the benefits of making and sticking to a plan that supports good sleep, then they might re-examine their choices about what truly are their ‘essential’ activities.”

(This paragragh comes from the National Sleep Foundation, https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/teens-and-sleep/page/0/3)

• Experience mantra meditation and visualization techniques for relaxation

• Enjoy a guided Yoga Nidra – the practice of gradual relaxation

Jen MastJen Mast
Like many yogis, the first moment Jen Mast stepped onto a yoga mat, in 2005, changed her life. Very quickly, Jen fully immersed herself in her yoga practice, finding amazing benefits physically and mentally. Jen vowed she would pay forward this amazing gift. In 2008, she brought yoga into the public school setting where she worked as a high school counselor. She witnessed firsthand the benefits of adding yoga into the Health and Wellness curriculum as well as in her one on one counseling sessions with her students. Jen is an RYT 500 hr. and she also received her Lifeforce Yoga® certification this past summer at Kripalu, training under Amy Weintraub, Yoga For Depression. Jen has a fun and uplifting teaching style that will leave you refreshed and enlightened.

Christine Fox July 2016Christine Fox
Christine has been practicing yoga since 2000. Her practice has evolved over the years and it was when she started a family that she embraced her yoga practice more than ever. It was her way to stay present, have compassion for herself, and better understand the connection with body, mind, breath, and spirit. This enriched her connection to her loved ones. Practicing yoga gives her strength to explore the edges of her comfort zone–to be curious about possibilities. Her respect and joy for yoga have her wanting to share this ancient practice with others to explore, together, possibilities in living with mindfulness and heartfelt intention. Christine completed a 500-hour certification in The Art of Teaching with Barbara Benagh from The Yoga Studio at Down Under School of Yoga, and, a 200-hour certification from Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health. She is also a certified Kripalu Yoga in the Schools teacher and delivers a research-based curriculum to foster self-regulation skills to adolescents. In addition, she has a teaching certification from Creative Kids Yoga to help children trust their intuition and move with intention through a variety of activities that are woven into the learning of yoga postures, breathing techniques, and creative movement. With much passion and joy, she teaches yoga to youth in the Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools in Acton, MA and in other schools in surrounding towns.


Revolution Community Yoga
537 Massachusetts Avenue
Acton, MA 01720
info@YogaActon.com
978-274-5596